Brian Jungen

Dream Sequins, 1993
Mountie Bottom, 1993
Untitled, 1997
Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
19.10.2016—15.01.2017

Brian Jungen is a Canadian artist of Swiss and Dane-zaa First Nation heritage whose works explore his own mixed identity in the contemporary globalized world. Jungen achieved international acclaim for his transformation of mundane, mass-produced objects to create anthropomorphic installations that question the political, economic, and social reverberations of cross-cultural sharing. His critique of postmodern culture materially, formally and conceptually destabilizes and blends stereotypes of identity, forwarding ideas of flux and instability.

La Biennale de Montréal presents the rarely seen early works of Jungen. His drawings, created between 1993 and 1997, showcase the critical mindset employed by Jungen to approach sensitive topics about postcolonial identity, family and community. These works offer a wide-ranging dialogue about the relationship between Indigenous and Settler societies in Canada, as well as First Nations and Third World communities. Jungen questions historicity to disrupt stereotypes about heritage and sexuality, and to investigate the particularities of present time and place. His works bring together the political, the sensual and the spiritual implications of identity, and how they manifest in today’s increasingly globalized world.
—EA

Dream SequinsMountie Bottom and Untitled is part of collection of the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, The University of British Columbia. Purchased with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance program and the Morris and Helen Belkin Foundation, 1998 (BG1838)

Brian Jungen and Geoffrey Farmer
The Lost Drawings of Geoffrey Farmer and Brian Jungen, 1995-1996/2002
Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
19.10.2016—15.01.2017

Brian Jungen is Canadian artist of mixed Swiss and Dane-zaa First Nation heritage. His work addresses notions of mixed identity through formal and material explorations on the political, economic and social implications of cross-cultural sharing. Canadian artist Geoffrey Farmer is known for combining drawing, film, sculpture, collage, performance, photography and found objects to create playful and complex installations that present his own take on literary, theatrical, and cinematic histories.

After studying together in the early 1990s at the Emily Carr University of Art & Design, Jungen and Farmer shared a studio in Vancouver wherein they collaborated on many process-based works. The Lost Drawings of Geoffrey Farmer and Brian Jungendemonstrates their early interests in identity politics and cultural studies. This series of surreal collages comprise found pages of snowboarding magazines on top of which the artists drew black Grim Reaper figures. Playing on the Surrealist idea of the “cadavre exquis”, their sinisterly humour debunks stereotypes about masculinity, sexuality, and male-centric snowboarding culture to impart new ideas about identity in contemporary life.

The Lost Drawings of Geoffrey Farmer and Brian Jungen is part of the collection of the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, The University of British Columbia, anonymous gift, 2007

Biography